7 Reasons to Visit Mexico City

Known to locals and jet-setters simply as the D.F. (short for Distrito Federal), Mexico City is an electric destination in the midst of a cultural revival. The nearly 500-year-old capital’s well-deserved reputation on the international arts circuit, along with a new crop of hip restaurants, bars and boutiques, is inspiring locals and luring travellers. From stylish dining and shopping spots in the Roma and Condesa neighbourhoods to the bustling, vendor-filled streets and landmark architecture of the Colonia Centro, you’ll find plenty of reasons to visit (and keep coming back). (read more)
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Around the World in 80 Wine Varietals: Tempranillo

Winemaking regions are often beautiful places. If you had to rank them, Rioja, in northern Spain, would surely fall into the world’s top ten. It lays south of the Cantabria mountain range, along the Ebro river, all rolling green hills and quaint medieval villages. La Rioja is also the spiritual home of Tempranillo, Spain’s noblest grape. (read more)

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Airports Are Stepping Up Their Coffee Game

Even the staunchest coffee geek caves at the airport and springs for Dunkin’ Donuts or whatever else is available. Why? It’s usually all you got. But several airports around North America are ramping up their coffee service to include single origin brews, specially trained baristas and pastries made by local chefs.

Food and beverage operator OTG has partnered with several local craft roasters, including Irving Farm in New York, Dogwood Coffee in Minneapolis and Sense Appeal in Toronto, as well as with Caffé Vita nationally to offer travelers a better pre-flight caffeinating experience. (read more)

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Around The World In 80 Wine Varietals: Sangiovese

Italian wine is complicated. Never mind that there are hundreds of grapes with hard-to-pronounce names indigenous to Italy and that the same genetic variety can have several different monikers depending on where it’s grown. The wines themselves are organized according to a strict hierarchy. It can be tricky for wine novices and even self-proclaimed oenophiles to decipher Italy’s complex wine classification system. (read more)

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TOMS Shoes Branches Out Into Coffee

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You probably first noticed the shoes six years ago. TOMS classic canvas slip ons are functional, practical and cute to boot. And when you learned that for every pair sold, the company gives a pair of shoes to a child in need, you probably went out and bought some. Five years after its 2006 launch, TOMS proposed a similar concept with eyewear, donating eye care to someone in need for every pair of glasses sold. Now, it’s applying its One for One model to a new effort: coffee beans for you, water for a community that needs it. (read more)

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Exotic Meats: The Joy, And Horror, Of Dining On Dog, Moose And Zebra

Like any adventurous traveler, when I’m abroad, I like to eat what the locals eat. Chili-roasted grasshoppers in Oaxaca, alpaca prosciutto in Valparaiso…when in Rome, yaddah-yaddah. But I’ll never be able to erase the memory of the dog market in South Korea where big breeds were caged up waiting to be sold for soup meat. I’d heard they were killed slowly, gruesomely to increase levels of adrenaline and, therefore, flavor. But who knows for sure. Either way, I never ate the dog meat soup I saw on menus around Seoul. But, why should it have bothered me so? I eat pork – and have you ever hung out with a piglet? They’re at least as smart and adorable as puppies. (read more)

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A Portuguese Wine Guide

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The extremely drinkable wines coming out of Portugal right now might be considered new, and the region deemed “emerging,” but the country has a tradition of winemaking that dates back to the Roman Empire. Hundreds of indigenous grape varieties grow here—like Baga, Alfrocheiro and Fernão Pires—many of which are blended, as is the Old World way. (read more)

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The Secret To Finding Underrated Wine? Know, And Follow, A Great Wine Importer.

People often ask me how I’m able to find such great wines. How do I know where to look? What to buy? Other oenophiles have an astounding memory for producer names and the remote villages from which they hail. The truth is that I’m terrible at remembering the names of wines I love or have read about and want to try. I rely on wine labels – particularly, the backs of them. I look for the name of the importer, a person or company whose taste I trust. (read more)

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Bourbon Sure Don’t Have To Come From Kentucky. Here Are 7 Out Of State Bottles.

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It’s the brownest of the brown liquors. Sweet, stiff bourbon. Ask any proud Kentuckian and they’ll tell you the real stuff must come from the heart of the Bluegrass State. And, indeed, Kentucky makes more than 95% of the country’s bourbon. But legally, bourbon doesn’t have to hail from Kentucky. To be called bourbon, a spirit must be made in America, from at least 51% corn and be aged in new, charred oak barrels. A growing number of small distilleries around the country are taking a stab at crafting the spirit. (read more)

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Hold The Spit Take! There’s Actually Some Good Wines Being Produced In Mexico.

When most of us think of “drinking Mexican,” we imagine ourselves sipping a refreshing margarita. Or maybe even an exotic mezcal. But Mexico’s wine producers want to remind us that they have been around for a very long time. Baja is one of the oldest winemaking regions in the New World. Wineries from the region are now making a push into the American market. After several generations of big, hot, brash wines, a new generation of producers is ready to show that they can make elegant world-class wine just like their neighbors to the north. (read more)

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About

chantal martineau

chantalmartineau
writer. tippler. bleeding heart.

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